News

NFHC Member- Dr. David Hyten selected for new faculty leadership program

January 30th, 2019

 

Lincoln, Neb. – NFHC member, Dr. David Hyten is one of 28 University of Nebraska-Lincoln faculty members selected by the Executive Vice Chancellor's office for the Faculty Leadership in Academia: From Inspiration to Reality (FLAIR) program.

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Nebraska microbiologist investigates antibiotics and gut health

December 19, 2018

Lincoln, Neb. — Commonly used antibiotics can work wonders when it comes to eradicating “bad” bacteria like those that cause strep throat, pneumonia or urinary tract infections. But how do they affect the “good” bacteria in your gastrointestinal microbiome?

Jennifer Auchtung, a food microbiologist at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, has been awarded a $387,955 grant from the Centers for Disease Control to begin searching for an answer to that question.

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NU regents approve $5 million mouse house to grow research into how the gut affects health

December 4, 2018

LINCOLN — University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists know the little guts of mice are similar enough to the human gut to yield valuable information.

The NU Board of Regents on Tuesday approved construction of a new $5 million facility where, among other things, mice will exist in a germ-free environment. The building will be privately funded and erected next door to the East Campus building in which the mice currently live.

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Early gut bacteria shape intestinal ecosystem

November 27, 2018

Beating their brethren to the gut can help bacteria make a lasting impression, says new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The study suggests that the order in which bacterial species stake out unclaimed territory in the gut can shape an intestinal ecosystem for a lifetime, potentially shifting the odds of certain health outcomes in the process.

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NFHC members receive recognition at Harvard conference

October 16, 2018

Two members of the Department of Food Science and Technology and the Nebraska Food for Health Center (NFHC) participated in the Gut Health, Microbiota, and Probiotics conference held last week at Harvard Medical School. This widely attended conference featured Dr. Jeff Gordon (Washington University) as the keynote speaker along with other leading international researchers in the gut microbiota field.

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Husker research to explore the emergence of specialized body parts, plants

August 21, 2018

Lincoln, Neb. — New research conducted by the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s James Schnable will use corn to test the idea that the emergence of specialized body parts occurs through whole genome duplication.

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Husker-developed bacterium outperforms commercial probiotic

August 9, 2018

University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have developed a probiotic — sometimes referred to as beneficial bacteria — inside the competitive environment of the human gut, where it successfully competed against trillions of microorganisms.

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Schnable receives early career award in maize genetics

April 16, 2018

Lincoln, Neb. — James Schnable, an assistant professor in the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture and Center for Plant Science Innovation at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, received the Marcus Rhoades Early Career Award in maize genetics at the 60th annual Maize Genetics Conference held in France on March 24.

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Pain in the gut: Microbe betrays neighbors to trigger IBD

A colon-dwelling bacterium may trigger inflammatory bowel diseases by raising the immune system’s alarm against its peaceful bacterial community, reports a recent study led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

In the absence of its bacterial neighbors, the offending Helicobacter bilis bacterium caused only mild gut inflammation in mice, the research team reported. But adding a community of just eight other bacterial species into the mix — a typical human gut contains several hundred — was enough to stir up a more severe inflammatory response.

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